Charity owned tech company aims to double payroll giving numbers by 2030

A group of charities, including Barnardo’s, Crisis and WaterAid, have launched a tech company with the aim of doubling the number of UK workers who give to charities regularly through their pay.

The ambition has been set out by their firm GoodPAYE, the charity owned payroll giving organisation that also involves the RNIB and the Royal British Legion. They hope to use technological innovation to enable UK workers to raise £150m for charities.

The firm warns that eight in ten UK companies don’t offer payroll giving to staff and just 4% of workers give to charity via their pay. By comparison 30% of workers in USA give to charity through their salary.

GoodPAYE is working with digital innovation consultancy Good Innovation and payroll giving agency PayCaptain.org to achieve its target.

“Through collaborative working, we’ve the opportunity to pool years of experience and expertise to provide a service that can generate huge social impact for the whole sector,” said GoodPAYE chair Tara Honeywell, who is head of commercial ventures at Barnardo’s.

“By exploring new ways to grow untapped markets, raise awareness of the tax benefits people can realise through giving through their payroll, all via a super seamless user experience we hope to drive more income into the sector and in turn, deliver more impact.”

Last month Charities Aid Foundation released figures showing it had raised more than £1.6bn for good causes through its payroll giving scheme since it launched 35 years ago.

This year’s annual payroll giving campaign almost doubled the number of donors signing up to this method of donating, through the three largest payroll giving agencies, run by the Charities Aid Foundation, Charities Trust and Charitable Giving.

Their figures show that more than £23m was donated through their salaries in the two months following February’s annual campaign.

    Share Story:

Recent Stories


How is the food and agricultural crisis affecting charity investment portfolios?
Charity Times editor, Lauren Weymouth, is joined by Jeneiv Shah, portfolio manager at Sarasin & Partners to discuss how the current pressures placed on agriculture and the wider food system is affecting charity investment portfolios.

Better Society