Charity handed ‘record’ £18m in government funding as part of cycling revival

The Bikeability Trust is to manage £18m in funding from the Department of Transport to boost cycling training across the UK and promote active travel among families.

The funding will be used to run on-road cycle training, the modern day equivalent of the ‘cycling proficiency’ scheme that was commonplace in many schools from the 1940s to the 1980s.

This includes courses for beginners as well as more advanced courses on handling busier roads.

Record investment

“The commitment of government to fund Bikeability in this next year is hugely welcomed as we seek to ensure that every child can access cycling as a life skill by 2025,” said Bikeability Trust executive director Emily Cherry.

“This record investment will allow us to reach more children and, importantly, their families too, as a result of additional funding for our Family module.”

A key aim is to improve the confidence of families to cycle together to stay healthy and promote environmental travel.

“Cycling is such a fun and healthy way for pupils to get to school, and we want as many as possible to make it their choice of transport,” said transport secretary Grant Shapps.

“With social distancing still a necessity, the more people who walk or cycle, the more we can keep ease pressure on public transport as people return to normal life.

“But we know not all children, or parents, feel bike-confident. Today’s funding will kick-start our plans to provide Bikeability training to all children by 2025, giving the next generation of cyclists a life skill and the confidence they need to choose a more active way to travel.”

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