Charity workers 'struggling with pace of digital change', survey reveals

Charity workers taking part in a worldwide survey of employees have raised fears about their ability to cope with the pace of technological change over the next five years.

Among charity workers surveyed almost four in five (79%) said they “do not feel prepared for digital skills that will be required in the next five years”.

A greater proportion (88%) they did not feel they are equipped with the necessary resources to learn new digital skills needed by 2027.

Only 15% of global charity workers said they were actively involved in digital skills and training programs. Among all UK workers the proportion is 19%.

Meanwhile, more than a quarter (28%) said they are fearful of pace of change in the workplace and 45% said they feel “overwhelmed by the rate of technological change” at work.

The findings have emerged in CRM firm Salesforce’s 2022 Global Digital Skills Index, which surveyed 23,5000 in a range of sectors across 19 countries.

“Reskilling is clearly a national priority, and we all have a responsibility to help people navigate learning and equip them to seize the opportunities of a digital-first future,” said Zahra Bahrololoumi, UKI chief executive for Salesforce.

It found that across all sectors globally that every day digital skills, such as website navigation and social media posting, “don’t necessarily translate to the core workplace digital skills” needed at work.

Among generation Z respondents almost two thirds (64%) said they have advanced social media skills but less than a third (31%) believe they have advanced digital workplace skills that are needed for work.

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