‘Deep shock and sadness’ after St Mungo’s CEO dies suddenly aged 57

St Mungo’s is in a state of “deep shock and sadness” after the death of its chief executive Steve Douglas.

The homelessness organisation has announced “with deep shock and sadness” that the 57-year-old charity leader passed away suddenly at this home on Sunday morning.

He leaves four children and his partner, confirmed the charity which added that “our deep condolences are with his family and friends at this incredibly difficult time”.

St Mungo’s chair Joanna Killian said that “we are all very saddened to learn of Steve’s untimely death”, adding “he had worked tirelessly in the housing and homelessness sector for many years and was deeply committed to St Mungo’s in the short time he had been working with us”.

Douglas joined the charity in 2020 after 25 years working in the housing sector. The previous year he was awarded a CBE in the Queen’s honours list for services to housing.

His previous roles include being group chief executive of housing and regeneration consultancy Altair. He has also been vice chair and board member at Amicus Horizon and then Optivo Housing Group for nine years.

Other roles included being executive regeneration director at the London Borough of Hackney in the run up to the 2012 Olympics.

Among others paying tribute is Peter Marsh, managing director of education and housing firm PMc Ltd.



Meanwhile, Staffordshire homelessness charity Concrete described Douglas as “a huge loss”, adding, “we’re thinking of Steve’s family and the St Mungo’s team at this sad time”.

Kevin Williams, executive director of affordable housing and care provider Guinness Partnership described Douglas as “a true gent with a great sense of humour”.

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