By Howard Lent

The Board of the Directory of Social Change has appointed Nick Seddon as its new Chair - at 31 the youngest ever.

Seddon is already known in the voluntary and charitable sector for his authorship of the controversial book Who Cares? published by Civitas.

Seddonhas been a social policy features writer for the Guardian and contributor to the Economist magazine.

A graduate of Cambridge University, he has been a research fellow at Civitas and is currently head of communications at Circle Health.

As well as a particular interest in government and public services, he is involved in the arts and sport and is a keen cook. In February he will also be taking up a new role as deputy director of independent think tank Reform.

DSC's chief executive, Debra Allcock Tyler, says: 'Nick has proven his credentials during his two years on our Board and has been an engaged and inspiring Trustee. Nick is the DSC's youngest ever Chair.

"It is exciting to have a chair who is so passionately interested in the sector, particularly going into an election year where the sector is going to be the focus of a great deal of attention."

Nick Seddon added: 'This is a tremendously exciting time for the DSC, an organisation which has done an incredible amount over the years to support charities and to champion independence in the sector.

"The new role is a challenging one, but it is an honour for me to have been elected to this post. As a board collectively we have a tremendous pool of talent, and I am committed to the development of an effective organisation that enables charities to transform society."

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