By Andrew Holt

Pessimism is growing in the NHS and social care as local leaders respond to mounting financial pressures, according to the latest quarterly monitoring report on service performance published by The King’s Fund.

For the first time, the report includes a survey of directors of adult social services in English local authorities alongside its usual survey of NHS finance directors.

Both surveys suggest that the financial squeeze is beginning to have an impact on quality and access to services in some parts of the country.

A third of NHS finance directors report that the quality of patient care has worsened during the last year and more than a third of social services directors expect to have to cut social care services over the next year.

While most NHS organisations are on track to meet financial targets, it is clear that pressures are growing towards the end of the second year of the so-called Nicholson Challenge to find £20 billion in productivity improvements by 2015.

The main findings from our survey of NHS finance directors are:

A third report that the quality of patient care in their area has worsened during the past year; this compares with only about 1 in 6 who said the same thing in our last survey

More than three-quarters expect to end the financial year in surplus, with only 3 anticipating a deficit; 34 are confident of achieving their cost improvement programme targets for 2012/13, with 9 expressing concern

In contrast, when asked how they felt in general about the financial state of their local health economy – not just their own organisation – over the next 12 months, around two-thirds were pessimistic.

With local authorities grappling with the second year of a budget squeeze that will see an overall cut of 27 per cent in central government funding by 2015, directors of adult social services are pessimistic about the financial outlook:

Nearly a third predict an overspend on their budgets, with a similar number expecting an underspend and 23 expecting to break even

The financial pressures are set to have a significant impact on access to services, with more than a third of directors anticipating having to reduce services and nearly a fifth expecting to increase charges over the next year

Nearly three-quarters said that they are pessimistic about the overall state of the local health and care economy over the next 12 months, with only 3 reporting any optimism.

The report also includes a dashboard of key NHS performance indicators.

While these are mostly stable, the proportion of patients waiting more than four hours in A&E is at its highest level for this quarter since 2003/4.

This remains within the government’s target range, with the increase to some extent accounted for by the relaxation in the target and seasonal factors.

However, with more than a quarter of trusts, reporting breaches of the target, it is clear that many hospitals are struggling to maintain performance in emergency care.

The main findings from the analysis of performance measures are:

4.3 per cent of patients spent longer than four hours in A&E in the third quarter of the current financial year

Waiting times for hospital treatment are stable, with the proportion of patients waiting longer than the operational standards having increased slightly for outpatients and reduced for all other waiting lists

Impressive reductions in health care-acquired infection rates continue, with a 13.5 per cent drop in C difficile and a drop of nearly 12 per cent in MRSA year-on-year counts to November 2012.

According to the official statistics, delays in transferring patients out of hospital remain stable, despite more than 60 per cent of NHS finance directors reporting that delayed transfers of care have worsened over the last year.

With other feedback also suggesting delayed transfers have got worse, the report calls for further investigation into this issue.

Professor John Appleby, chief economist at The King’s Fund said: "The NHS faces unprecedented financial pressures, and there are growing worries that patient care will suffer.

"For social care, it will be increasingly difficult for councils to make further savings without directly cutting services or affecting quality. Health and care services have coped well until now, but it is clear that many organisations expect things to become much more difficult over the coming year."

Home     More News


Other stories you may find of interest:

David Cameron: Leadership for a better Britain
David Cameron put the Big Society at the heart of his keynote conference speech yesterday, stating: "My driving mission in politics is to build a Big Society, a stronger society." He said: "It starts with families. I want to make this the most family-friendly government the country has ever seen. More childcare. More health visitors. More relationship support. More help with parenting. And for the 120,000 families that are most troubled - and causing the most trouble - a commitment to turn their lives around by the end of this Parliament."

Sector welcomes Nick Hurd's interim response to Lord Hodgson
The sector has welcomed Nick Hurd's interim response to Lord Hodgson’s review of the 2006 Charities Act. In his letter the minister for Civil Society applauds the work of Lord Hodgson, which has also been praised by charities. Hurd has chosen not to accept the controversial proposal to make it easier to pay trustees but all the other proposals he categorises as ‘green’ or ‘amber’.

4Children chief executive condemns greater spending cuts idea
4Children's chief executive has warned policies put forward by Conservative MP Dr Liam Fox would have a devastating impact on Britain's low income families. The former Conservative defence secretary has called for greater spending cuts and tax cuts, including the temporary abolition of capital gains tax.




Has your investment manager downgraded your service?

Jordans

February-March 2014: Trustees & CEO Pay

Trustees came under the spotlight last year because of their reluctance to defend
the salaries of their chief executives. The sector has since offered trustees opportunities to learn from the experience. It is an opportunity they must take, argues Andrew Holt

December/January 2013-14: Impact Leadership

Tris Lumley takes the reader on an in-depth journey analysing impact
leadership, arguing that impact starts with leadership

This website is a part of Perspective Publishing Limited, registered in England No 2876166.
By using this website you agree to our COOKIE POLICY and PRIVACY POLICY.