What were the most read charity opinion pieces of 2018?

Written by Charity Times
20/12/18

As the year draws to a close, we take a look at the five most popular opinion pieces to have hit the Charity Times website this year:

1. Louise Thomson: The seven deadly sins of trustee recruitment

"Charities and their boards don’t always help themselves when it comes to recruiting new trustees. With 90 per cent recruited by ‘word of mouth’ and only 10 per cent of trustee positions advertised (according to Getting on Board research), it is unsurprising that charities regularly report that trustee recruitment is challenging."

Read more here.

2. Louise Thomson: When is the right time for trustees to move on?

"Individual trustees must be honest in the self-reflection of their performance and commitment. As human beings however, and for the best of intentions, we are not always that honest with ourselves. Unfortunately, this lack of self-awareness can have a real and adverse impact on those causes for which we claim to be working."

Read more here.

3. Rebecca Packwood: Other small charities should consider a merger like ours

"Contrary to my initial expectations, it became apparent that partnering with small local charities was not the answer. The key to the long-term sustainability and growth of the charity would only come with a larger national organisation, who could offer a much greater scope for expansion without compromising on our values and would help us retain our individual identity."

Read more here.

4. David Fairnsworth : Our sector is at tipping point

"Funding for charities from the EU is currently worth at least £258m a year. Brexit will inevitably put this at risk, putting even greater pressure on everyone in the sector. Right now, the situation is that there is greater need and less money. With around 163,000 charities in the UK the desire to support good causes is there, but most have a very low income."

Read more here.

5. Caron Bradshaw: Charities are still being far too quiet about Brexit

"Wherever you are on the politics of this, there is one thing we must all do now - speak up for our beneficiaries. If you haven’t already done so, make representations to your MPs. Your voice is critical and we are fast running out of time for consideration to be given to the issues of most importance to our sector."

Read more here.



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